cuirassier:

Prussian cuirassiers during the Seven years war, G. Dorn

cuirassier:

Prussian cuirassiers during the Seven years war, G. Dorn

61 notes

bantarleton:

Major O’Shea of the Loyal Cork Legion, 1798. Martin Archer Shee.

bantarleton:

Major O’Shea of the Loyal Cork Legion, 1798. Martin Archer Shee.

48 notes

bantarleton:

On this day, precisely 230 years ago, British forces evacuated New York City — Thomas Musgrave, commander of the 40th, was commandant of the city — according to regimental and local lore, soldiers of the 40th nailed the King’s Colors to the main flag pole in Battery Park, and greased the pole before leaving the city, and the colonies for the last time.

bantarleton:

On this day, precisely 230 years ago, British forces evacuated New York City — Thomas Musgrave, commander of the 40th, was commandant of the city — according to regimental and local lore, soldiers of the 40th nailed the King’s Colors to the main flag pole in Battery Park, and greased the pole before leaving the city, and the colonies for the last time.

26 notes

Jean-Baptiste Belley (1746-1805), native of Senegal, slave in the French West Indies, and later a member of the National Convention of the First Republic.

Jean-Baptiste Belley (1746-1805), native of Senegal, slave in the French West Indies, and later a member of the National Convention of the First Republic.

(Source: zimbabwe2003)

125 notes

medievalpoc:

John Faber
Prince William Ansa Sasraku
England (1749)
Mezzotint, after a painting by Gabriel Mathias.

The Akwamu, Denkyira, Akim and Fanti people of what is now Ghana were involved throughout the eighteenth century in wars to control trading links with Europeans on the coast. In the mid-century the king of the Akwamu, Nana Ansa Sasraku, came to dominate a vast stretch of land from Denkyira to the Accra plains. To consolidate his power, Sasraku knew that effective communication was needed with the main trading partners - the Europeans. Sasraku realised that he needed a trusted English-speaking mediator and so arranged for his son to be educated in England.
The British sea captain to whom Prince William Ansa Sesraku was entrusted took him instead to Barbados and sold him into slavery. Luckily for the prince, his father’s control of West African trade was important enough for the young man to be retrieved and taken to London as promised. The prince was the toast of the town and his story was told in prints, poems, newspaper reports and a book entitled The Royal African.
(With thanks to Otoobour Djan Kwasi II and Adelaide Adu-Amankwah)

-The British Museum

medievalpoc:

John Faber

Prince William Ansa Sasraku

England (1749)

Mezzotint, after a painting by Gabriel Mathias.

The Akwamu, Denkyira, Akim and Fanti people of what is now Ghana were involved throughout the eighteenth century in wars to control trading links with Europeans on the coast. In the mid-century the king of the Akwamu, Nana Ansa Sasraku, came to dominate a vast stretch of land from Denkyira to the Accra plains. To consolidate his power, Sasraku knew that effective communication was needed with the main trading partners - the Europeans. Sasraku realised that he needed a trusted English-speaking mediator and so arranged for his son to be educated in England.

The British sea captain to whom Prince William Ansa Sesraku was entrusted took him instead to Barbados and sold him into slavery. Luckily for the prince, his father’s control of West African trade was important enough for the young man to be retrieved and taken to London as promised. The prince was the toast of the town and his story was told in prints, poems, newspaper reports and a book entitled The Royal African.

(With thanks to Otoobour Djan Kwasi II and Adelaide Adu-Amankwah)

-The British Museum

414 notes

"It would require a great philosopher and historian to explain the causes of the famous Seven Years War in which Europe was engaged and in which Barry’s regiment on was now on it’s way to take part. Let it suffice to say that England and Prussia were allies and at war against the French, the Swedes, the Russians, and the Austrians…"

5 notes

his-name-was-writ-in-water:

Boots and coatee worn by Paul I of Russia at his coronation, 1797.

Paul I, son of Peter III and Catherine the Great, came to the throne in 1796 after his mother’s long reign. For his coronation, he wore a uniform that he had designed himself in the style of Prussian military uniform. The day after his coronation, the emperor ordered all the imperial regiments including the two life guards regiments, Semenovsky and Preobrazhensky, to adopt the same style.

Paul I was the first Russian emperor to wear military uniform at his coronation. His interest in uniforms was echoed by Great Britain’s Prince of Wales (the future King George IV), who was colonel of several regiments and collected uniforms. When Napoleon Bonaparte became Emperor of France in 1802, he began to wear his army uniform for everyday dress.

(c)The Moscow Kremlin Museums

167 notes

cuirassier:

General Braddock is wounded at the battle of Monongahela ( 9 July 1755) He died  several days later at 13 July.

cuirassier:

General Braddock is wounded at the battle of Monongahela ( 9 July 1755) He died  several days later at 13 July.

19 notes